Mystery solved over details of buried memorial.

Sometime ago under the sub heading of the “what’s in a name” section of this website I wrote a story about GEORGE REES -CARADOG BACH, who was a celebrated musician from Carmarthen. In that story I speculated that the pink granite memorial that had lain face down for over half a century could have been that of GEORGE REES’.  I can now report that today, both myself and my brother Robert, together with the aid of a pulley mechanism and much heaving and pulling managed to turn over the granite headstone to reveal it’s secret and the family who are buried there, and who are not recorded on the burial plan which was produced in 1977. The family inscription on this elaborate and extremely heavy memorial is given below. Interestingly however, the surname of the first named – DAVID GEORGE  does not appear which sometimes can be misleading to family historians and proves that inscriptions on memorials need careful interpretation……Here then is the inscription.

The pink granite memorial and it’s inscription

In loving memory of DAVID GEORGE, son of Thomas & Hannah Phillips 42 Lammas Street in this town who died October 27th 1892 aged 19. “The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away” Also of the above Hannah Phillips who died June 10th 1927 in her 78th year. “Thy will be done” Also the said Thomas Phillips who died November 5th 1933 aged 87 years.” Come unto me and rest”

 

In due course this memorial will be re- erected to it’s proper position and once again be visible for all to see after 50 years of being buried in the mud and overgrowth. Sadly however, Caradog Bach’s memorial still remains unaccounted for but we will continue to search for it. The Thomas and Elizabeth Mayhook Charity will continue to carry on it’s maintenance, upkeep and restoration of St David’s Cemetery to the best of it’s ability during these worrying times, in particular the grass cutting and strimming. Thank you all for your continued help, support and encouragement which is much appreciated.

Richard J Goodridge ( Chairman)

the scaffolding and hoist used to lift up the memorial and turn it over to reveal the names of those buried there.